Intel Galileo : Compatible with Arduino software and shields


When every one is gaga on PI, Intel introducing the Galileo development board, the first product in a new family of Arduino*-compatible development boards featuring Intel® architecture. The platform is easy to use for new designers and for those looking to take designs to the next level. Intel recognizes that the people who take creating beautiful things into their own hands with innovation and technology are the same ones that propel us forward. The other big feature of Galileo is that it is compatible with Arduino software and shields, making it a great target for students and educators in the maker scene. And what more, Intel is donating 50,000 Arduino compatible development boards featuring Intel® architecture to 1,000 universities around the world over the next 18 months.

Galilio

The Galileo board features a flexible, low-power, 400MHz Quark SoC X1000.

The Galileo development board is a great tool for quickly prototyping simple, interactive designs such as LED light displays that respond to social media, or for tackling more complex projects, from automating home appliances to building life-size robots controlled by a smartphone.

This platform provides the ease of Intel architecture development through support for the Microsoft Windows*, Mac OS* and Linux* host operating systems. It also brings the simplicity of the Arduino software integrated development environment (IDE). It’s all about delivering Intel performance and quality to the DIY maker community—to support invention and creativity.

Intel_Quark_SoC

The Quark implementation on the board is a single-core running at 400MHz (single speed, there’s no speedstep equivalent here). There’s a 16KB L1 cache and 512KB on-die embedded SRAM. The design is 32-bit Pentium ISA compatible (Intel apparently loves starting out new projects with the Pentium ISA), and features a core that should be roughly 1/5 the size of Atom and capable of operating at as little as 1/10 the power.

The Quark implementation on the board is a single-core running at 400MHz (single speed, there’s no speedstep equivalent here). There’s a 16KB L1 cache and 512KB on-die embedded SRAM. The board features a 10/100 Ethernet, mini-PCIe slot (PCIe gen 2 x1), USB 2 host controller, USB client connector, JTAG header and 256MB of DRAM. Galileo also features an 8MB SPI Flash for firmware/bootloader/sketch storage. MicroSD card support is optional. Galileo measures 4.2 inches long by 2.8 inches wide.

Boards will be available for sale by the end of November, at a price under $60. I knew that you guys wanted to know more about this new kid, please click here for all your queries…thanks!

Source:  Intel Galileo

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This article was written by admin

Admin has over twenty years experience in the electronics industry, largely dedicated to embedded software. A frequent presenter at conferences and seminars and author of numerous technical articles. Working presently as Development Manager in India. A firm Believer in Knowledge grows when it shared.

Comments

Comments (2)
  1. nethra says - Posted: October 4, 2013

    Good tutorials thanks for sharing this………..

  2. jalaja says - Posted: October 4, 2013

    Nice information lol thanks for sharing this tutorial………

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